Solo artist Mike Daisey on Rob Ford and framing the story | Q with Jian Ghomeshi | CBC Radio

Today I had one of those famous “driveway moments” with this piece.  If you’re short on time, I recommend starting it at minute nine, where Daisey discusses media and storytelling, in part:

…as a media literate society, everyone should understand in their bones…that every single story is crafted by people who are telling you the story…  A remarkable number of people in our culture don’t think about that in a deep way, because it’s a lot harder to get through life if you’re constantly thinking about the frame of things, but if you do think about the frame of things, it’s really the only ethical way to try to get through life and have a sense of the forces at play.

Leave a Comment

Filed under Storywire

On Ghost Stories : Neil Gaiman

“We’ve been telling each other tales of otherness, of life beyond the grave for a long time. Stories that prickle the flesh and make the shadows deeper, and most importantly remind us that we live, and that there is something special, something unique and remarkable about the state of being alive.”
Listen to more from Neil Gaiman’s talk at TED 2014 over at Brain Pickings.

Leave a Comment

Filed under He Says/She Says, Storywire

Should lit crit be an art or a science? asks Joshua Rothman

“The basic idea in Moretti’s work is that, if you really want to understand literature, you can’t just read a few books or poems over and over … Instead, you have to work with hundreds or even thousands of texts at a time. By turning those books into data, and analyzing that data, you can discover facts about literature in general—facts that are true not just about a small number of canonized works but about what the critic Margaret Cohen has called the ‘Great Unread.’”
Read the full article on newyorker.com.

Leave a Comment

Filed under Storywire

“All of life is lived through story.” : Bryan Delaney

“All of life is lived through story…Story is how we make meaning of our lives.  Every waking moment we’re bombarded by story,” said playwright Bryan Delaney, speaking to an audience in the Round Room at Dublin’s Mansion House during the March 17th, 2014 event We Need to Talk About Ireland.  This remarkable talk is well worth listening to.

 

Leave a Comment

Filed under He Says/She Says, Storywire

Hollywood at War – Five Major Directors with a Mission : David Denby

“Fusing art, politics, and history, Riefenstahl had composed a symphonic ode to domination. For the American filmmakers, living in a rowdy democracy, no such grand synthesis was possible, or even imaginable. But how do you create war propaganda in a democratic country? Do you just make movies promoting victory? Is it possible to work, under military sponsorship, as an artist and a truthteller?”  Read the full article in the New Yorker.

Leave a Comment

Filed under Storytraining

Wrestling with Criticism & Other -Isms in a Real-Time World : Elisabeth Donnelly on Flavorwire

“So even if criticism can be reductionist, concerned with ‘-isms’ and occasionally nonsensical interpretations of one’s work…there can be something to engaging with people’s frustrations, figuring out how it can make your art better. Maybe it’s what’s going to happen in the new world, where artists have to tweet and figure out how to engage with the world, in order to survive.”
Read the full article on Flavorwire.

Leave a Comment

Filed under Storywire

Cate Blanchett: “Audiences want to see” female protagonists

“…those of us in the industry who are still foolishly clinging to the idea that female films with women at the center are niche experiences. They are not. Audiences want to see them, and, in fact, they make money.”
Watch Cate Blanchett’s Academy Award acceptance speech on heraldsun.com.au.

Leave a Comment

Filed under Storywire

Are the New ‘Golden Age’ TV Shows the New Novels? : Adam Kirsch and Mohsin Hamid

“Television is not the new novel. Television is the old novel.”
Read the full post at NYTimes.com.

Leave a Comment

Filed under Storywire

Is Amazon Bad for Books? : George Packer

“Bezos is right: gatekeepers are inherently élitist, and some of them have been weakened, in no small part, because of their complacency and short-term thinking. But gatekeepers are also barriers against the complete commercialization of ideas, allowing new talent the time to develop and learn to tell difficult truths. When the last gatekeeper but one is gone, will Amazon care whether a book is any good?”  Read the full article in The New Yorker.

Leave a Comment

Filed under Storywire

Can Crowd Funding Replace Artists’ Day Jobs? (Elizabeth Weiss / The New Yorker)

“If we believe artists perform labor of value, we should also care about how (and whether) they get paid.”
Read the full article in The New Yorker.

Leave a Comment

Filed under Storywire